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Drain replacement at Kingsley Lodge for University of Chester

Chester University Kingsley Lodge drain replacement

We at Maxiflow have been proud to work in partnership with the University of Chester on many occasions. The University has gone from strength to strength over the years, and we enjoy helping to maintain our city’s prestigious institutions.

Recently, we completed a series of significant drainage works at one of the University’s accommodation buildings. Kingsley Lodge houses 35 students, just down the road from the University of Chester’s main campus.

Replacing drains at University of Chester's accommodation

Upon investigation it was discovered that the soil beneath the drains had settled, causing the pipes to bow. This meant that the seals between the pipework had ruptured, resulting in leaks and frequent blockages. In addition, there were were a number of infestations of plant roots found throughout the system. Kingsley Lodge’s drains had sustained too much damage to be repaired, and it was determined that a complete replacement was necessary.

Kingsley Lodge’s grounds contain approximately 60 metres of drains, with access provided through 6 manholes. Because the drainage system runs underneath a car park, excavators were brought in to dig down through the tarmac and concrete. Some brickwork manholes were also broken down. We were then able to remove the defective pipework and the excess debris.

Before and after pictures drain excavation at University of Chester

Before and after comparison of drain works

We installed all-new preformed plastic drains and manholes throughout the Kingsley Lodge site. Pipe runs and joints were sealed with resin patch liners. High-pressure water jetting was utilized to remove the root infestations from connecting lines. After the pipe works were completed, the trenches were backfilled with layers of sub base. These freshly-filled holes were then covered with layers of tarmac, compacted with a roller and then sealed with hot bitumen.

We would like to thank TP Construction for their assistance on this project, and would also like to thank the University of Chester for furthering their partnership with us.

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